Review: Joya de Nicaragua Cabinetta Serie

Joyo de Nicaragua Cabinetta Serie
Wrapper: Ecuadorian Connecticut Shade and Nicaraguan Habana Criollo
Binder: Nicaragua
Filler: Nicaragua
Sizes: Lancero, Double Corona, Toro, Belicoso, Perfecto, Corona, Robusto
Retail: about $6
Size for review: Robusto

Lil whiskey and a Joya de Nicaragua Cabinetta make a great pair

Lil whiskey and a Joya de Nicaragua Cabinetta make a great pair


This is another cigar that came to me via the Puff.com raffle last month. So much good stuff kept filling my mailbox, and, believe it or not, it’s not over yet! The Joya de Nicaragua Cabinetta (JdN) came in early and hung out in my tupperdor for a bit. A short time later, there was a review over on My First Cigar that really got me more interested in this dual-wrapped cigar. While I only had this for a couple weeks, the person that sent it to me had it for 6 months. This cigar was ready to smoke.

The classic looking band hides the seam of the two different tobaccos

The classic looking band hides the seam of the two different tobaccos


The cigar is wrapped with two different tobaccos. Ecuadorian shade grown Connecticut makes up the bulk of the cigar, from the JdN band down. The Connecticut wrapper a couple thin veins but keeps a great looking appearance. Above the band is Nicaraguan grown Habana Criollo that is a nice milk chocolate brown color. Besides the couple veins in the Connecticut wrapper, the cigar appears perfect. The barrel of the cigar smells of tobacco and kind of barnyard-ish. The foot smelled kind of sweet, fruity, and with a hint of tobacco. In fact, it smelled VERY much like the Ventura Project805 I reviewed recently. A lot.

The JdN Cabinetta grabs for attention with two different tobaccos wrapping the cigar

The JdN Cabinetta grabs for attention with two different tobaccos wrapping the cigar


Before firing up the JdN Cabinetta, the dry draw was just slightly firm, about the way I like it. It tasted of fruit–black cherry or prunes–and chocolate. Toasting up the foot, there was a mild-bodied blast of flavors that, well, tasted like everything. There were flavors of sweet oak, earth, leather, hints of tobacco and pepper. Just a bit of everything. Within a few puffs, things came down to sweet oak and kitchen spice. There was even a slight tea-like quality to things. There was a fair amount of smoke being produced as well. The retrohale brought along a lot of cedar that I wasn’t expecting. The burn is sharp and straight. The off-white ash falls at about one inch long.

Right about here the whole cigar changes with pepper making a comeback and cream joining the party.

Right about here the whole cigar changes with pepper making a comeback and cream joining the party.


Moving into the second third, the sweet oak starts to remind me woodshop class back in the day. There is a dry sawdust feel too it. The retrohale has changed from cedar to a most definitely black pepper, so I’m wondering if the pepper, combined with oak, gives that dry sawdust sensation. The kitchen spice remains, and at this point I would say it is very much like coriander–little bit of savory, little bit of citrus. The JdN is quite tasty, and while it does remind me of the Project805, I find it much better. I would assume this is what that cigar would taste like if given some more time to rest and age.

Part way through the second third, there is a ramp of of cream building up in the cigar. The JdN Cabinetta start off sweet, and that sweetness has slowly built up through the length of the cigar. The new-found cream intensifies that effect. At the same time, pepper makes a return as a main flavor component, not seen since lighting the cigar. While not yet to the band that visually divides each wrapper, I’m guessing at the point the Criollo is now coming into play underneath the Connecticut tobacco.

The seam between the two tobaccos is flawless. It is hard to tell which is on top.

The seam between the two tobaccos is flawless. It is hard to tell which is on top.


The sweet cream, oak and pepper flavors remain through the rest of the cigar. Peeling off the band and smoking well into the Habana Criollo wrapper produced no flavor changes. Actually, I found the cigar had a hard time once it moved into the head portion, and did not want to keep on burning. There are a couple sources that say that this cigar isn’t supposed to be smoked beyond the band. I’m left wondering if the cigar knows that some how.

In this end, this is a fairly mild to mild-medium flavored cigar that can be appreciated at any time of the day and by novice and experienced cigar smokers alike. It is very approachable and easy to smoke. I think it might be time for me to find a few of the lancero-sized Joya de Nicaragua Cabinettas to save and smoke when there is a little more age to them

About the author

Isaac Miller is a stay at home dad, kayak fisherman and a cigar fiend.