Review: Camacho Corojo Maduro old vs new

Since I smoked my first Camacho Corojo Maduro, I have been a big fan. It’s a tasty cigar. It’s a strong cigar. It even made an appearance in Cigar Aficionado’s Top 25 of the Year list. Last year, though, Camacho got a face-lift. Many of the cigars in the line were re-blended. They all received new bands. A few were even dropped altogether. I’ve been bummed about this for some time. I started hoarding my Camacho Corojos in both natural and maduro forms. I didn’t want to try the new version. I liked what I had.

The newer "bold" Band is certainly not as classy as the original

The newer “bold” Band is certainly not as classy as the original, but it certainly grabs attention


Since last year there have been many reviews of all the newly blended Camacho cigars. Interestingly enough, many of the reviews pointed out that they had never had the original blends. I couldn’t get an answer as to how they compare. That was the tough part. From what I had read, things sounded different, but they also looked like they were the same cigar, as you’ll see below.

Both Camacho Corojo Maduros have a very similar profile. Both are Cuban-seed Honduran Corojo puros. Both feature the same 5th Priming Honduran Corojo wrapper. Both have Honduran Corojo binders. Both have pure Honduran Corojo fillers. Only the newer blend points out that the filler is a blend of three different primings.

I’ve been thinking about this review for some time now. My stash of older Camacho Corojo Maduros are all from work, The Stash. I happened upon Tinder Box this last weekend where I bought the newer cigar. With both cigars in hand, I headed to Detention and ultimately decided to smoke both of them at the same. Why? Because if there was a difference, smoking them both at the same time was going to be the best way, I felt, to notice any discrepancies between the two cigars. No need to leave it up to what I remember about the first cigar.

Smoking both the old and new Camacho Corojo Maduro at the same time

Smoking both the old and new Camacho Corojo Maduro at the same time

Besides the large difference in the bands, the older maduro does appear to be a little darker than the younger. This might be due to age as the older does have a couple years of rest to it. The new “bolder” maduro does look to have some thinner veins in the wrapper. Both have a nice triple cap and are, all around, well constructed cigars.

The pre-light draw of the original is mostly chocolate notes, while the newer brings chocolate and a cayenne spiciness. From here on out, I’ll be referring the cigars as #1, original, and #2, the re-blend.

The First toasts up a bit sweet with a good spice note. Hints of wood and hay join soon enough. In the beginning there is a variety of flavors; Cedar, leather, spice are prevail, along with a chocolate sweetness. Through the first third, #1 is holding something back. It has a great flavor, though a bit on the milder side. The smoke is warm and plentiful

Old on the right, the newcomer on the left. The Naccionales (5.5x44) original isn't box pressed, this is just from natural, in box aging

Old on the right, the newcomer on the left. The Naccionales (5.5×44) original isn’t box pressed, this is just from natural, in box aging

The Second fires up with peppery cedar, mild earth. Strong pepper notes hit the sinuses. Moving through the first third, #2 really shows that it is a different cigar. Flavors of cedar, leather and spice prevail, but they also come with a thick, creamy mouthfeel not present in #1. The newer blend produces a lot more smoke when at rest.

Moving into the second-third of the cigar, #1 has a predominant cedar flavor. The downside, however, is that when I put it down to focus on #2, it seems to like to burn out, leading to a couple re-lights. One is also burning faster, likely due to the difference in vitolas. When it is burning, it is a bit wavy, though never getting out of control. Throughout the segment, cedar prevails, even on the retrohale.

Much of the same comes from #2. Cedar is the name of the game, but #2 provides a bit of pepper spice as well. Again, #2 comes with a much fuller mouthfeel, that I’m finding satisfying. The creamy smoke on the palate, though does tone down the cedar notes just a touch. On occasion, especially after a sip of water, I can pick up some grassy notes as well. Much like the other, #2 is showing off some burn issues as well. I’m pretty sure this is due to the amount of time I’m giving between sampling the two cigars, and I’m doing my best to keep them rotating.

Coming close to the end. Both have had some burn issues, but I attribute that to smoking them both at the same time

Coming close to the end. Both have had some burn issues, but I attribute that to smoking them both at the same time


The last third breathes fire with #1. Wood and tobacco flavors intermingle with spicy pepper notes. While the flavors are the same as has been present most of the smoke, it has grown in intensity from the very beginning. The flavors are fairly sharp in that they are discernible, and with little question. I have enjoyed every one of these I have ever fired up.

Two comes into the last third just as it left off in the second, cedar and spice. Much like #1, some tobacco flavors join in the fray. The sweet and creamy thick mouthfeel has been present the whole smoke. You can taste the flavors in your gums and cheeks. It permeates the senses.

In the end, while the two cigars present very similar flavor profiles, they were both very unique and different cigars. Considering both cigars are, essentially, made entirely from the same plant, it’s hard to expect that things are going to be especially different. However, I was surprised at how much the texture of the smoking experience was changed. I prefer the flavors and the way the flavors evolve through the first two thirds of the original Camacho Corojo Maduro. I like how clean the flavors are in the original as well.

In the end, the new Corojo Maduro was a more enjoyable cigar.

In the end, the new Corojo Maduro was a more enjoyable cigar.

But “Bold” really is better. The new incarnation of the Corojo Maduro is, in the end, much more satisfying. The thick smoke does something for me. It’s like drinking 1% milk your whole life and switching to whole milk. Yes, it’s milk, it’s the same stuff, the flavor is the same, there’s just something so much better about the whole milk.

I’m not going to stop hoarding the old Corojos though.

About the author

Isaac Miller is a stay at home dad, kayak fisherman and a cigar fiend.